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Wirral University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

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Flu and Children

If you have a child over six months of age who has one of the conditions listed on page 4, they should have a flu vaccination. All these children are more likely to become severely ill if they catch flu, and it could make their existing condition worse. Talk to your GP about your child having the flu vaccination before the flu season starts.

The flu vaccine does not work well in babies under six months of age so it is not recommended. This is why it is so important that pregnant women have the vaccination – they will pass on some immunity to their baby that will protect them during the early months of their life.

Some other groups of children are also being offered the flu vaccination. This is to help protect them against the disease and help reduce its spread both to other children, including their brothers or sisters, and, of course, their parents and grandparents.

This will help you to avoid the need to take time off work because of flu or to look after your children with flu.

The children being offered the vaccine this year, are:

 All two and three years of age

All children in reception class and school years 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

Children aged two and three years will be given the vaccination at their general practice usually by the practice nurse. Nearly all eligible children in reception year and school years 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 throughout England will be offered the flu vaccine in school.

For most children, the vaccine will be given as a spray in each nostril. This is a very quick and painless procedure. For more information on children and flu vaccination see the NHS Choices information at nhs.uk/child-flu