Good evening, This is our updated website. We are still working on it. Your feedback will help us improve it.
[Skip to Content]
Wirral University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Antenatal Care

The pattern of antenatal care depends on individual circumstances.  For low risk pregnancies, all care will be given in the community.  For higher risk pregnancies, care will be shared between hospital and community, as needed.

6-12 weeks - Early access to Community Midwife at GP surgery or designated centres/hubs.

10-12 weeks – Your first midwife appointment (also called the booking appointment) should happen around 10-12 weeks pregnant.The appointment usually takes around an hour.

 

6 - 12 weeks

Early access to Community Midwife at GP surgery or designated centres/hubs.

 

10 - 12 weeks

Your first midwife appointment (also called the booking appointment) should happen around 10-12 weeks pregnant.The appointment usually takes around an hour.

12 week scan

If you're pregnant in England you'll be offered an ultrasound scan at around 10 to 14 weeks of pregnancy. This is called the dating scan. It's used to see how far along in your pregnancy you are and check your baby's development. The scan may also be part of a screening test for Down's syndrome.

Your midwife or doctor will book you a dating scan appointment. It will usually take place at your local hospital ultrasound department. Most scans are carried out by sonographers.

16 weeks

Your midwife or doctor will give you information about the ultrasound scan you'll be offered at 18 to 20 weeks.

They'll also help with any concerns or questions you have.

Your midwife or doctor should: 

  • review, discuss and record the results of any screening tests
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein
  • consider an iron supplement if you're anaemic

18 - 20 weeks

You'll be offered an ultrasound scan to check the physical development of your baby. This is also known as the 20-week scan. The scan wil be performed at the hospital and a support person will be able to accompany you. There is an opportunity to purchase images of the scan.

Screening for HIV, syphilis and hepatitis B will be offered again by a specialist midwife if you opted not to have it earlier in pregnancy.

These tests are recommended as they greatly reduce the risk of passing infection from you to your baby.

From 16 weeks, you'll be offered the whooping cough vaccine. The best time to have this vaccine is after your scan, up to 32 weeks. 

But if for any reason you miss the vaccine, you can still have it up until you go into labour.

25 weeks

You'll have an appointment at 25 weeks if this is your first baby.

Your midwife:

  • use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein

28 weeks

Your midwife: 

  • Use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus.
  • Measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein.
  • Offer more screening tests.
  • Offer your first anti-D treatment if you're rhesus negative.
  • Consider an iron supplement if you're anaemic.

31 weeks

You'll have an appointment at 31 weeks if this is your first baby.

Your midwife should:

  • Review, discuss and record the results of any screening tests from the last appointment.
  • Use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus.
  • Measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein.

34 weeks

Your midwife should give you information about preparing for labour and birth, including how to recognise active labour, ways of coping with pain in labour, and your birth plan.

Your midwife: 

  • Review, discuss and record the results of any screening tests from the last appointment.
  • Use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus.
  • Measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein.
  • Offer your second anti-D treatment if you're rhesus negative.

They'll discuss with you the reasons why a caesarean might be offered, what the procedure involves, the risks and benefits, and the implications for future pregnancies and births.

36 weeks

Your midwife should give you information about:

  • Breastfeeding.
  • Caring for your newborn baby.
  • Vitamin K and screening tests for your newborn baby.
  • Your own health after your baby is born.
  • The "baby blues" and postnatal depression

Your midwife will also:

  • Use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus.
  • Check the position of your baby.
  • Measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein.
  • Offer external cephalic version (ECV) if your baby is in the breech position
  • There will be an opportunity at this appointment to discuss labour and birth including where you wish to have your baby and what type of birth you wish to have.

38 weeks

Your midwife or doctor will discuss the options and choices about what happens if your pregnancy lasts longer than 41 weeks.

Your midwife should: 

  • Use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus.
  • Measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein.

40 weeks

You'll have an appointment at 40 weeks

Your midwife should give you more information about what happens if your pregnancy lasts longer than 41 weeks.

Your midwife should:

  • Use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus.
  • Measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein.
  • Membrane sweep, also known as a cervical sweep to bring on labour will be discussed.

41 weeks

Your midwife should:

  • Use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus.
  • Measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein.
  • Offer a membrane sweep.
  • Discuss the options and choices for induction of labour

42 weeks

If you have not had your baby by 42 weeks and have chosen not to have an induction, you should be offered increased monitoring of the baby.