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Wirral University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Maternity Research

Studies that you can join now

STUDY TITLE

The Tommy’s National Rainbow Clinic Study

What is this study about?

The majority of women who have experienced the loss of a baby will embark on another pregnancy, usually within a year. Previous studies suggest that parents should receive specialist support from doctors and midwives in a future pregnancy to reduce the risk of pregnancy complications and to provide the care and support they need.

Rainbow Clinics aim to provide specialist care and support to families who have experienced the death of a baby during pregnancy or shortly afterwards. The first established clinic witnessed improvements in the pregnancy outcomes and patient experience. The study evaluates the care provided in these clinics across the United Kingdom, to look at where care can be improved. Your experiences will help to do this.

Who can take part?

Women who have had a prior stillbirth, neonatal death or late termination of pregnancy, and who are currently pregnant.

Research contact and further information

Julie Grindey - Julie.grindey@nhs.net, mobile 07768490736

Clinical lead

Ms Rajeshwari Myagerimath, Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist, Fetal Medicine Specialist

Recruitment closing date

30th September 2025

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STUDY TITLE

Multiple Pregnancy Registry

What is the study about?

This study aims to answer the many questions we still have about the best way to look after women with a multiple pregnancy and their babies.

Multiple pregnancy is associated with additional risks compared to singleton pregnancy, and women carrying multiples require close monitoring.

There are many gaps in our knowledge where we are not certain about the best treatment to offer in pregnancies which develop complications and about the best way to monitor for the development of these complications. This registry will help us to answer these important questions, which will help us to improve the care of women with multiple pregnancy and their babies. 

Who can take part?

Women with complicated multiple pregnancies, triplet pregnancies, uncomplicated monochorionic twin pregnancies, or any multiple pregnancy (twin or triplet) complicated by twin to twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS).

Research contact and further information

Julie Grindey - Julie.grindey@nhs.net, mobile 07768490736

Clinical lead

Ms Rajeshwari Myagerimath, Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist, Fetal Medicine Specialist

Recruitment closing date

22nd May 2025

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STUDY TITLE

SNAP3 - Smoking Nicotine in Pregnancy

What is the study about?

Using nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), such as nicotine patches, is safer than smoking in pregnancy and can help people stop smoking.
Stopping smoking in pregnancy can be hard. SNAP3 is looking at new ways of supporting pregnant women to use NRT to make it easier for women to try to stop.

By taking part in SNAP3 you can help improve stop smoking support for pregnant women.

Who can take part?

Women who are less than 25 weeks pregnant, who smoke 5 or more cigarettes a day, and would like to receive help to quit using nicotine replacement therapy patches.

Research contact and further information

Julie Grindey - Julie.grindey@nhs.net, mobile 07768490736

Clinical lead

Dr Angela Kerrigan, Consultant Midwife

Recruitment closing date

31st December 2025

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STUDY TITLE

MiNESS 20-28 - mothers working to prevent early stillbirth

What is the study about?

The study looks at medical factors associated with early stillbirth but also environmental, lifestyle and healthcare factors that can affect pregnancy and the wellbeing of the baby. The study plans to include 316 people with an early stillbirth (20-28 weeks), and 630 people with ongoing pregnancies of the same length. Once there is a better understanding of early stillbirth, we can develop ways to reduce the frequency of stillbirth, so fewer parents experience the loss of their child at this stage of pregnancy.

Who can take part?

Women who have recently experienced baby loss during pregnancy, labour or immediately after birth between 20-28 weeks of pregnancy. Women who are still pregnant or have recently given birth at the same pregnancy length.

Research contact and further information

Julie Grindey - Julie.grindey@nhs.net, mobile 07768490736

Clinical lead

Julie Grindey, Research Midwife

Recruitment closing date

28th February 2026